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F.H. Furr's Plumbing, Heating, Cooling & Electrical Insider Blog

Plumbing: Get The Real Dirt On Plungers!

You might think you know a thing or two about basic plumbing, but did you know that there are a wide variety of different types of plungers? This handy household instrument is the primary “go-to” tool for those pesky drain clogs. However, not many homeowners are aware of the fact that different types of plungers exist for specific kinds of drains. It’s important that you know which type of plunger should be used and where before walking into a store and simply purchasing the first one you see.

There are typically four kinds of plungers:

Standard plunger—this should be termed “sink plunger,” but is the one that typically comes to mind when you think of a plunger (and most likely the first one that homeowners grab at the store). The standard plunger has a long handle with a rubber suction cup at the end. Despite common usage, this plunger is best used to remedy clogged sinks. The makeup of this plunger does best on flat surfaces. Though it works, as you well know, on toilets and other fixtures—it is more difficult to position in just the right fashion; and for particularly tricky clogs, it can be downright impossible!

Toilet Plunger—this plunger looks like the standard plunger, but with a slight modification: within the rubber suction cup is an extra rubber fixture that forms to the area of the toilet needing unclogged. Homeowners may fold the inside rubber flap if needed for a sink or tub. The toilet plunger should actually be termed “standard plunger,” because the flexible rubber flap allows homeowners to use it on other fixtures in the home, such as the tub or sink.

Accordion Plunger—this little miracle makes music! Just kidding. But as the name suggests, it has an accordion-like structure. This is your plunger for really bothersome toilet clogs. Because of the size of its cup and sturdy nature, it creates a lot of force for toilet clogs. It is slightly more difficult to handle, and not to be used on any home fixture other than a toilet.

Taze Plunger— This plunger isn’t for use inside your home, so if you see it, just pass on by. A taze plunger is used for larger pipes and is not a common household item. The long steel rod forces a disc into the clogged pipe to dislodge the blockage.

Well, now you know for the next time you find yourself metaphorically “up the river without a plunger,” remember: not all plungers are created equal and not all plumbing issues are the same. Some are simply DIY projects that are easily cured with the help of your trusty plunger, while others will call for a more technical approach, and F.H. Furr is always available when you need us! As always, you can call us for all of your plumbing needs, no matter what!

 

Topics: plumbing