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F.H. Furr's Plumbing, Heating, Cooling & Electrical Insider Blog

5 Signs Your Water Has Too Much Iron

bathroom-faucet-with-brown-running-water

The quality of your home’s water might not be something you put much thought into, but the water that travels through your plumbing system can come with all sorts of sediment and deposits. Many of these impurities are normal and completely harmless, but a high concentration of something could begin to cause issues. For example, an overload of iron in your water!

One of the major signs that homeowners notice first with an iron problem is orange staining, so if you’ve seen this, then read on! Although iron isn’t harmful to the body, it can cause several issues with your water:

1. Staining 

As mentioned above, one of the most common issues with iron-saturated water is its propensity to leave stains around the faucet to entire showers or bathtubs coated in an orange film. Even if your water comes out clear, if it’s iron-heavy, the iron oxidizes with the air, creating rust after the fact.

Not only can it stain the porcelain in your bathrooms, but it can also stain clothing or cause it to appear dingier after washing. It can even weaken garments, causing them to become more likely to fray. Similarly, your dishes may start developing rust stains or spots over time.

2. Bitter Taste

A small amount of iron in the water won’t be noticeable, but if there’s a high concentration, it might feel like you’ve got pennies in your glass!

3. Foul Smell

If your water has a rotten egg smell, this likely indicates the presence of sulfur, but it could also mean too much iron. The smell will be most potent when the water runs and can linger in places like sinks, toilets, or showers.

4. Water Discoloration

Two types of iron can make their way into your home’s water; ferrous and ferric. Ferrous is the type that is dissolved in the water but shows up on surfaces later, while ferric is visible as a rust color in the water.

5. Clogged Pipes

One of the worst and most costly problems with iron in the water is clogged pipes. In severe cases, when the iron concentration is exceptionally high, it can begin to build up in pipes, and over time can cause clogged drains and faucets. If this occurs, repairs and replacements will be necessary.

Fortunately, there's a solution to your iron problem! Having a professional plumber come to your home to perform a water test to determine the condition of your water is a great option. So, give our professional plumbers a call today! We're ready to serve you. 

Topics: Plumbing Water iron