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F.H. Furr's Plumbing, Heating, Cooling & Electrical Insider Blog

4 Reasons Not to Use Liquid Drain Cleaners

Sure, you want that stubborn drain clog gone quickly. Your first reaction to a clog may be to grab a bottle of liquid drain cleaner, pour it down the drain, and go about your day. But we are here to tell you that liquid drain cleaners do more harm than good. So, before reaching for liquid drain cleaner, be sure you understand the potential risks and problems they cause.

Here are 4 reasons you shouldn’t rely on liquid drain cleaners:

  1. Drain Cleaners Are Toxic

Direct contact with drain cleaners can irritate your eyes, burn your skin, and cause shortness of breath. Mixing drain cleaners, even accidentally, with other cleaning products can result in deadly gasses. Drain cleaner should never be used in standing water in toilets or clogged showers.

  1. Damage to Your Plumbing Pipes

Drain cleaners cause internal and external damage to your home’s plumbing system. Leftover chemicals can eat away at the finishes of sinks and toilets. For example, leftover solution can settle onto the porcelain and cause cracks later down the road. Plastic or PVC pipes are vulnerable to corrosion caused by chemicals in drain cleaners. Metal pipes can also be damaged by these harsh chemicals. Pipe corrosion can lead to a burst pipe, which and can lead to a serious plumbing emergency, such as a flood.

  1. Only a Temporary Fix

Drain cleaners are quick fixes to an underlying problem. If you’re noticing frequent, recurring clogs, drain cleaners won’t address the root of the problem.

  1. Environmental Hazard

The chemicals in drain cleaners are horrific for the environment. The residue left in bottles ends up in landfills, and can enter the water, poisoning fish and other wildlife.

Fortunately, there are a few natural, drain-safe remedies to use if you encounter a clogged drain. When you notice your drain is starting to clog, pour a ½ cup of baking soda down the clogged drain, followed by a ½ cup of vinegar and cover the drain with a wet cloth. Wait five minutes and then flush with hot water.

Liquid drain cleaner can’t replace the expertise and knowledge of a plumber. If you don’t work with a trusted plumber to find out why a clog is occurring, you may literally be pouring money down the drain by continuing to rely on a drain cleaner for a quick fix. If you want more information about how to fix clogs, contact F.H. Furr today!

Topics: plumbing maintenance Clogged Drain Plumbing DIY